Tuesday Top Ten

top ten movie

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by the Broke and the Bookish. Book bloggers create their own lists based on the chosen topics and post links to our lists. It’s a way of all sharing our thoughts and our love of books.  And who doesn’t love lists??

So this week’s challenge was to list the best/worst movie adaptations from books.  To be fair, I only considered those where I have read the book and have seen the movie.  There are many, many that I could add to both the lists of good and bad, but most are just mediocre – not fantastic, but not awful enough to offend me!  You will see that my list is pretty heavy on children’s movies – having kids these are the movies I have seen the most often and typically multiple times so they are the ones that stuck with me!

The Good

  1. Harry Potter – I won’t try to pick the best of the movies – but they were all fantastic – some followed the books more closely than ever, but I never was disappointed after watching a Harry Potter movie.
  2. The Wizard of Oz – The movie may arguably be better than the book (ruby slippers are far superior to silver ones!).
  3. Gone with the Wind – A classic, beautiful costumes, wonderful cast, just a great movie if you have four hours to spare!
  4. To Kill a Mockingbird – Another classic – both the book and the movie are fabulous.
  5. Because of Winn Dixie – A wonderful family movie with a cast of great actors that closely mirrored the book.
  6. Charlotte’s Web – Both the 1973 animated movie and the 2006 movie were both fantastic depictions of this great childhood favorite.

The Bad

  1. Tale of Despereaux – I LOVED this book and I HATED this movie!  It was the most awful depiction of a book that I have ever seen, even my kids could not sit through it.  Don’t waste your time!
  2. The Cat in the Hat – Great children’s book, horribly overdone ridiculous movie.

Some of Both…

  1. How the Grinch Stole Christmas – The 1966 cartoon is still a favorite from my childhood and I eagerly watch it every Christmas, but I am not a fan of the 2000 movie – too annoying, overdone, and ridiculous.
  2. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – I loved the 1971 version, a childhood classic, and an amazing world full of candy!  But the 2005 version?  I’m sorry, but Johnny Depp was far too creepy – I would never let my kids go into a candy factory with his character!

Tuesday Top Ten

toptenbookquotes

 

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by the Broke and the Bookish. Book bloggers create their own lists based on the chosen topics and post links to our lists. It’s a way of all sharing our thoughts and our love of books.  And who doesn’t love lists??

So this week the challenge was the Tuesday Rewind – go back and pick a topic that you really liked or one that you missed from a previous week.  Since I haven’t been doing this for too long I had a lot to choose from and decided to go with a list of some of my favorite book quotes.  I may have ended up with more than ten… and there were so many more that I wanted to add!

First, two quotes from the amazing Book Thief by Markus Zusak…

  1. I have hated words and I have loved them, and I hope I have made them right. 
  2. I wanted to tell the book thief many things, about beauty and brutality. But what could I tell her about those things that she didn’t already know? I wanted to explain that I am constantly overestimating and underestimating the human race—that rarely do I ever simply estimate it. I wanted to ask her how the same thing could be so ugly and so glorious, and its words and stories so damning and brilliant.
    None of those things, however, came out of my mouth.
    All I was able to do was turn to Liesel Meminger and tell her the only truth I truly know. I said it to the book thief and I say it now to you.
    I am haunted by humans.

And then I will move on to another ten…  😉

  1.  The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go. – Dr. Seuss,  I Can Read with my Eyes Shut
  2. Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book. – John Green, The Fault in Our Stars
  3. Promise me you’ll always remember: You’re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.  –  A.A. Milne, Winnie the Pooh
  4. “Once upon a time,” he said out loud to the darkness. He said these words because they were the best, the most powerful words that he knew and just the saying of them comforted him.  – Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
  5. “Harry — I think I’ve just understood something! I’ve got to go to the library!”
    And she sprinted away, up the stairs.
    “What does she understand?” said Harry distractedly, still looking around, trying to tell where the voice had come from.
    “Loads more than I do,” said Ron, shaking his head.
    “But why’s she got to go to the library?”
    “Because that’s what Hermione does,” said Ron, shrugging. “When in doubt, go to the library.” 
     –  J.K. Rowling, The Chamber of Secrets
  6. “But you want murderous feelings? Hang around librarians,” confided Gamache. “All that silence. Gives them ideas.”  – Louise Penny, Rule Against Murder
  7. Walking the stacks in a library, dragging your fingers across the spines-it’s hard not to feel the presence of sleeping spirits. –  Robin Sloan, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore
  8. “The books are to remind us what asses and fools we are. They’re Caesar’s praetorian guard, whispering as the parade roars down the avenue, ‘Remember, Caesar, thou art mortal.’ Most of us can’t rush around, talk to everyone, know all the cities of the world, we haven’t time, money or that many friends. The things you’re looking for, Montag, are in the world, but the only way the average chap will ever see ninety-nine per cent of them is in a book. Don’t ask for guarantees. And don’t look to be saved in any one thing, person, machine, or library. Do your own bit of saving, and if you drown, at least die knowing you were headed for shore.” – Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451
  9. “It’s like the people who believe they’ll be happy if they go and live somewhere else, but who learn it doesn’t work that way. Wherever you go, you take yourself with you. If you see what I mean.” – Neil Gaiman, The Graveyard Book
  10. From time to time, I do consider that I might be mad. Like any self-respecting lunatic, however, I am always quick to dismiss any doubts about my sanity.  – Dean Koontz, Odd Thomas

Because I <3 Kate DiCamillo!

I’ve mentioned my fondness for reading out loud to my kids.  We do occasionally read picture books; I find them fascinating, particularly the illustrations and the complexity that can be found in stories simply told.  But mostly we read chapter books out loud.  We have read everything from classics (Heidi, Little Women, The Secret Garden, Dickens, etc) to newer releases (Ungifted, Homesick, Liar & Spy, The Graveyard Book, etc).  I think we have all enjoyed everything that we have read together, there were no real losers, and we enjoy the time together regardless, but some of our favorites have been novels by Kate DiCamillo.  She weaves magical tales that are completely absorbing, include captivating illustrations, and are a pleasure to read aloud (Dickens – not so much!).  Since I believe we have completed all of her children’s novels, I thought I would share a summary of them and what I particularly loved about each.  Don’t dismiss these novels just because you don’t have kids – or because they’re too young or too old – these are great stories for any of us!
Image“The world is dark, and light is precious. Come closer, dear reader. You must trust me. I’m telling you a story.”  This is how The Tale of Despereaux begins and you are completely enchanted until the very end.  DiCamillo has written a modern-day fairy tale, the story of a mouse that is not like other mice, with his love of music, books, and the princess.  The story of a rat that lives in the darkness but is enchanted by light.  And the story of a slow-witted servant girl who simply wishes to be a princess.  Their stories all come together as the author directly tells you, the reader, this intertwining story in beautiful and thoughtful language.  While I loved all of her books, this was by far my favorite (a mouse that loves to read – how can you go wrong?).  The movie?  Don’t bother!

   Title: The Tale of Despereaux
   Author: Kate DiCamillo
   Genre: Children’s Fiction
   Pages: 272
   Publication: Candlewick, 2003

ImageEdward Tulane is a conceited china rabbit (yes – you read that right, but trust me – it works!) who is lost by his owner and goes on a journey of redemption, to learn of love and loss, from garbage piles to the bottom of the ocean to a hobo camp and beyond.  “Open your heart. Someone will come. Someone will come for you. But first you must open your heart…”

   

  Title: The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane
   Author: Kate DiCamillo
   Genre: Children’s Fiction
   Pages: 228
   Publication: Candlewick, 2006

ImageOpal moves with her father, the preacher, to Florida where she finds Winn-Dixie, a big, ugly, loveable dog who will be the friend she needs so desperately, while helping her to make friends in this new place.  She spends the summer learning the stories of Otis (the ex-con running the pet store), Franny (the local librarian), and Gloria (the blind woman who sees into Opal’s heart), while also using Winn-Dixie to get her father to tell her about her long-gone mother.  Opal will start to grow up, learn how to make friends, and begin to understand forgiveness, all with the help of a dog named after a grocery story.  “It’s hard not to immediately fall in love with a dog who has a good sense of humor.”  The movie based on this book is definitely worth watching AFTER you read the book (let’s face it – the book is ALWAYS better!).

   Title: Because of Winn Dixie
   Author: Kate DiCamillo
   Genre: Children’s Fiction
   Pages: 288
   Publication: Candlewick, 2000

ImageA fortune teller answers Peter’s question with an odd answer – an elephant will lead him there.  The question?  Peter is an orphan and wants to know if his little sister is still alive.  The same day, a magician will somehow conjure an elephant which will bring together the lives of Peter, a society matron, a beggar, the magician, a policeman, a sculptor, and a nun in a series of events that will eventually lead him to his answer, and will provide answers to others as well.  “That is surely the truth, at least for now. But perhaps you have not noticed: the truth is forever changing.”

   Title: The Magician’s Elephant
   Author: Kate DiCamillo
   Genre: Children’s Fiction
   Pages: 208
   Publication: Candlewick, 2009

ImageRob’s mother has died of cancer and he and his father move to Florida looking to find a new life.  Rob is terribly unhappy when he meets someone else new at school, Sistine, who is also struggling with the hope that her father is going to come and get her.  When Rob discovers a caged tiger in the woods, the events that follow will allow him to understand what it means to be free, to open up and forge a friendship with Sistine, learn to forgive his father, and deal with his grief.  “Rob had a way of not-thinking about things.  He imagined himself as a suitcase that was too full… He made all his feelings go inside the suitcase; he stuffed them in tight and then sat on the suitcase and he locked it shut. That was the way he not-thought about things.  Sometimes it was hard to keep the suitcase shut.  But now he had something to put on top of it.  The Tiger.  Rob imagined the tiger on top of his suitcase, blinking his golden eyes, sitting proud and strong, unaffected by all the non-thoughts inside straining to come out.”

   Title: The Tiger Rising
   Author: Kate DiCamillo
   Genre: Children’s Fiction
   Pages: 128
   Publication: Candlewick, 2001